Global Temperature for September 2021 is 0.81C

The average temperature was 0.81 C in September. This was up a little from August (0.76C). However 2021 is turning out to cooler than recent years with an average annual temperature with 3 months remaining of 0.69C. This makes it on track to be the coolest year since 2014.

Annual average temperatures (2021 first 9 months)

The monthly data show the effects of the 2021 La Nina.

Monthly average temperatures updated to September 2021

This strong La Nina is evident in the latest SST data.

Over land areas cold spots in Siberia, Greenland and Alaska/Kamchatka are evident.

With just 3 months to go and a continuing la Nina,  it looks almost certain that 2021 will either be the coldest or the next coldest of the last 7 years.

You can download the monthly and annual data here and these are updated regularly.

About Clive Best

PhD High Energy Physics Worked at CERN, Rutherford Lab, JET, JRC, OSVision
This entry was posted in AGW and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Global Temperature for September 2021 is 0.81C

  1. Cytokinin says:

    I wonder how much temperature was influenced by there being a solar minimum? I also wonder how much temperature will be affected by the earth’s weakening magnetic field, since this will permit increased penetration by cosmic radiation a more high level clouds, which are reputed to have a stronger albedo than lower level clouds?

  2. entropic man says:

    “I wonder how much temperature was influenced by there being a solar minimum? ”

    Very little. If the variation in solar insolation over the cycle were large enough to be detectable we would see an 11 year global temperature cycle. We do not.

    ” I also wonder how much temperature will be affected by the earth’s weakening magnetic field, since this will permit increased penetration by cosmic radiation”

    Very little change. The CLOUD experiment at CERN showed that the Svenmark effect is too small to be detected over the solar cycle.

    “more high level clouds, which are reputed to have a stronger albedo than lower level clouds”

    Lower level clouds have a higher albedo than high level clouds.

  3. Bindidon says:

    This is well confirmed by this year’s Arctic sea ice extent.

    When looking at

    https://masie_web.apps.nsidc.org/pub//DATASETS/NOAA/G02135/north/monthly/data/

    you see that the extent levels for August and September both are higher than in any year after 2014.

    And a look at the daily data

    https://masie_web.apps.nsidc.org/pub//DATASETS/NOAA/G02135/north/daily/data/

    tells us a lot about how quick the extent increases back this year.

    Since mid of September, I had no opportunity to update the data below

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1QBlh325tHF-4NRlWsHf_6sgskO_ipyse/view

    When coming back home by mid November, that update might become a little surprise.

  4. Randall Reviere says:

    Clive – A fellow named Chris Rentsch ( @crentch ) on twitter has been providing some interesting results on his twitter feed.

    See:

    https://twitter.com/i/status/1445859548108001283

Leave a Reply